Try again. Fail again. Fail better.
Install Theme

CARMEN MIRANDA 2014 by Paula Nacif

(Source: youtube.com)

Rhizome supports the creation of significant new art through commissions and direct funding for artists. These works may take various forms and scales, but are tied together by their considered illumination of contemporary digital culture. Today, I outline our vision for awarding money to artists in 2014-15, focusing on three new initiatives with funding totaling nearly $40,000. 
via Rhizome | Rhizome’s 2014-15 Support for Artists: Announcing New Microgrants and Commissions

Rhizome supports the creation of significant new art through commissions and direct funding for artists. These works may take various forms and scales, but are tied together by their considered illumination of contemporary digital culture. Today, I outline our vision for awarding money to artists in 2014-15, focusing on three new initiatives with funding totaling nearly $40,000.
via Rhizome | Rhizome’s 2014-15 Support for Artists: Announcing New Microgrants and Commissions

There is always another breath in my breath, another thought in my thought, another possession in what I possess, a thousand things and a thousand beings implicated in my complications: every true thought is an aggression. It is not a question of our undergoing influences, but of being ‘insufflations’ and fluctuations, or merging with them. That everything is so ‘complicated,’ that I may be an other, that something else thinks in us in an aggression which is the aggression of thought, in a multiplication which is the multiplication of the body, or in a violence which is the violence of language—this is the joyful message. For we are so sure of living again (without resurrection) only because so many beings and things think in us…

— Gilles Deleuze, “Phantasm and Modern Literature,” The Logic of Sense (via heteroglossia)

(via cyborges)

lolz

(Source: youtube.com)

(Source: zombiegraycat, via anarcho-animeism)

(via spiritandteeth)

Unlike other subcultures—skinheads, Teddy Boys, and Rude Boys in Britain; hippies, Beats, and bikers in the States—mods were something radically different: in their bespoke suits and careful haberdashery, they looked sharp because, to some extent, they were desirous of great things. Like we conference-goers aim to be, they were professional. Indeed, mods had jobs (remember “Billy Hunt”?). And unlike so many later subcultures that announced themselves in absolutely oppositional terms—punks, say, whose aggressively shredded look served as a general fuck you—mods didn’t hide the fact that they shopped, and cared about what they bought. While they attacked middle-class office drudgery and lily-white respectability, they also rejected a rigid British class system that denied them access to a life of consumer luxuries and services—a life brimming with the very stuff work would enable them to purchase. Mods were, in short, a half-rebellious youth subculture that kept one eye trained on the rewards of adulthood. Mostly working-class kids, they railed against the system because, deep down, they wanted their share of its bounty.

Maria Lassnig Kantate - YouTube →

I´ve scrambled up the peaks and reached the summit
my whole long life just lies beneath my feet.
But I´m still searching for — the stone of wisdom
Life´s made me cautious, Life still calls the beat.

mocatv:

"Mike [Kelley] told me that he saw this early, I guess you could call it a band, that I had when I was going to school in Toronto. He called it noise garage, which was actually great, because I never had a name for what we did. Our teacher, George Manupelli, got us a gig at the ann Arbor Film Festival. They ended up pulling the plug on us. But Mike was there, and I didn’t meet him, but he said it kind of inspired him to go home and start a noise garage band. And I guess that became Destroy All Monsters."—Kim Gordon. 
[Photo: Kelley and Gordon, Los Angeles, 1985. Courtesy of John Hamois.]

mocatv:

"Mike [Kelley] told me that he saw this early, I guess you could call it a band, that I had when I was going to school in Toronto. He called it noise garage, which was actually great, because I never had a name for what we did. Our teacher, George Manupelli, got us a gig at the ann Arbor Film Festival. They ended up pulling the plug on us. But Mike was there, and I didn’t meet him, but he said it kind of inspired him to go home and start a noise garage band. And I guess that became Destroy All Monsters."—Kim Gordon

[Photo: Kelley and Gordon, Los Angeles, 1985. Courtesy of John Hamois.]

(via goosebumpsfitsandmalaria)

Sean Carney on the Twombly debacle via Facebook.
thecoalitionmag:

we are looking for submissions and contributors for our august issue. come thru with ur illustrations, photography, stories, poetry, diary entries that u dont mind us invading, whatever it is u want to share. here are the guidelines and deadline is the 31st. go fucking nuts, children!

thecoalitionmag:

we are looking for submissions and contributors for our august issue. come thru with ur illustrations, photography, stories, poetry, diary entries that u dont mind us invading, whatever it is u want to share. here are the guidelines and deadline is the 31st. go fucking nuts, children!

(via immigrantgirls)

I grew up with the idea that if you had the choice between gaining an experience and getting a thing, take the experience. And I’ve always done that. When I take a trip someplace, it lasts my lifetime; no one can take it away from me. I relive it all the time, and that intangible sense is what I really love. Objects I love, too, but not enough to want to have them in my possession.

— Holland Cotter —> http://bit.ly/1pgONq6 (via artpractical)

In February 2005, YouTube was launched and forever changed our relationship to moving images, both as viewers and producers. But even well before then, the web had made a large variety of new materials accessible to see and to download, as well as upload. “From the Cloud” is a video program that looks at found footage “films” in the Internet Age. The proliferation of archived photographs, digital images, and videos made available to everyone online as well as an exponential increase in production has changed the way artists interact with pre-existing material. The artists in this program both pull material from the cloud and implicitly comment on the cloud by doing so. 

via FROM THE CLOUD | Spectacle

In February 2005, YouTube was launched and forever changed our relationship to moving images, both as viewers and producers. But even well before then, the web had made a large variety of new materials accessible to see and to download, as well as upload. “From the Cloud” is a video program that looks at found footage “films” in the Internet Age. The proliferation of archived photographs, digital images, and videos made available to everyone online as well as an exponential increase in production has changed the way artists interact with pre-existing material. The artists in this program both pull material from the cloud and implicitly comment on the cloud by doing so.

via FROM THE CLOUD | Spectacle

artsandsciencesprojects:

Sol LeWitt’s statement on artists’ books
Art-Rite Magazine #14: Artist’s Books (January 1976)

artsandsciencesprojects:

Sol LeWitt’s statement on artists’ books

Art-Rite Magazine #14: Artist’s Books (January 1976)

(via the3oclockbook)

Transfer Gallery →

transfer-gallery:

POSTmatter interview