Try again. Fail again. Fail better.
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fan girling all over the place. cannot wait for this book!
johannafateman:

ICON 
Coming October 1!

fan girling all over the place. cannot wait for this book!

johannafateman:

ICON 

Coming October 1!

In the connection of disparate elements, there is a reinvention of nature. There is liberation in being able to create an identity that is uniquely one’s own, outside of strict binary gender which is why the ideas of the cyborgs and utopia resonate so strongly within queer dialogue. The Cyborg Manifesto functions as a call to action, to move beyond strict identities of gender, for as we move into a perhaps bodiless realm, clearly the politics of body also change. The lines can be blurred between the human and the machine, and I am reminded of Battlestar Galactica and the Cylon. At what point is a human not a machine, as it is slowly adding techno-limbs and cyberdata? At what point is the machine human? In fifteen years will we be able to answer this? (via Girls That Run In Packs #theplastics | CARETS AND STICKS)

In the connection of disparate elements, there is a reinvention of nature. There is liberation in being able to create an identity that is uniquely one’s own, outside of strict binary gender which is why the ideas of the cyborgs and utopia resonate so strongly within queer dialogue. The Cyborg Manifesto functions as a call to action, to move beyond strict identities of gender, for as we move into a perhaps bodiless realm, clearly the politics of body also change. The lines can be blurred between the human and the machine, and I am reminded of Battlestar Galactica and the Cylon. At what point is a human not a machine, as it is slowly adding techno-limbs and cyberdata? At what point is the machine human? In fifteen years will we be able to answer this? (via Girls That Run In Packs #theplastics | CARETS AND STICKS)

Excerpt from a Tracy and the Plastics performance

(Source: youtube.com)

The room of the modern person is stark, but in its simplicity it exudes wealth and sophistication. There is just an iPad and a simple bed or futon. None of the old-time accouterments, which signified intelligence, artistic interest, or a curiosity about the world, are evident. There are no magazines, books, or records anywhere. Just perhaps some high priced toiletries in the bathroom. Everything she needs is on the iCloud.

How long before we’re convinced that hands, arms, legs, and appendages are just bothersome?

The cyber-lords have already convinced us that maps, paper, pens, and even push buttons are somehow incredibly inconvenient and clumsy, leaving us scraping and pawing like drooling bug life on their flat digital dildos. Google’s search engines and applications have likewise taught us to refrain from using our apparently out-of-date and hopelessly inefficient brains.

What’s next? Giving up all thought, consciousness, history, and agency.

Hoarders are the only thing standing between these incomprehensibly rich, all-controlling, indecent, digital super-despots and the complete destruction of any alternative consciousness — and indeed any non-official history or interpretation of the world.

*swoon*

All Power to the Pack Rats | Jacobin

Ian Svenonius in Jacobin!

(via towerofsleep)

gorgeoustaps:

"We are examining ourselves refracted through a couple thousand followers, creating an ever more prismatic version of identity. It’s possible that this could dispel a notion of rigid self-identity and begin to vaporize the ego into a collective expression and ethical experience of reality.”
Interview by Jesse Darling for Rhizome 

gorgeoustaps:

"We are examining ourselves refracted through a couple thousand followers, creating an ever more prismatic version of identity. It’s possible that this could dispel a notion of rigid self-identity and begin to vaporize the ego into a collective expression and ethical experience of reality.”

Interview by Jesse Darling for Rhizome 

The point of my practice is that formats are fluid, that an artwork can now live as something beyond that, and constantly shift between mediums and contexts. This is, to me, how the internet has added options to what an artwork can be, what an image can be, and how it can move and display itself.

Kari Altmann, “An Interview with Kari Altmann” by Jean Kay in atractivoquenobello, 2014. (via gim-museum)

CARMEN MIRANDA 2014 by Paula Nacif

(Source: youtube.com)

Rhizome supports the creation of significant new art through commissions and direct funding for artists. These works may take various forms and scales, but are tied together by their considered illumination of contemporary digital culture. Today, I outline our vision for awarding money to artists in 2014-15, focusing on three new initiatives with funding totaling nearly $40,000. 
via Rhizome | Rhizome’s 2014-15 Support for Artists: Announcing New Microgrants and Commissions

Rhizome supports the creation of significant new art through commissions and direct funding for artists. These works may take various forms and scales, but are tied together by their considered illumination of contemporary digital culture. Today, I outline our vision for awarding money to artists in 2014-15, focusing on three new initiatives with funding totaling nearly $40,000.
via Rhizome | Rhizome’s 2014-15 Support for Artists: Announcing New Microgrants and Commissions

There is always another breath in my breath, another thought in my thought, another possession in what I possess, a thousand things and a thousand beings implicated in my complications: every true thought is an aggression. It is not a question of our undergoing influences, but of being ‘insufflations’ and fluctuations, or merging with them. That everything is so ‘complicated,’ that I may be an other, that something else thinks in us in an aggression which is the aggression of thought, in a multiplication which is the multiplication of the body, or in a violence which is the violence of language—this is the joyful message. For we are so sure of living again (without resurrection) only because so many beings and things think in us…

— Gilles Deleuze, “Phantasm and Modern Literature,” The Logic of Sense (via heteroglossia)

(via cyborges)

lolz

(Source: youtube.com)

(Source: zombiegraycat, via anarcho-animeism)

(via spiritandteeth)

Unlike other subcultures—skinheads, Teddy Boys, and Rude Boys in Britain; hippies, Beats, and bikers in the States—mods were something radically different: in their bespoke suits and careful haberdashery, they looked sharp because, to some extent, they were desirous of great things. Like we conference-goers aim to be, they were professional. Indeed, mods had jobs (remember “Billy Hunt”?). And unlike so many later subcultures that announced themselves in absolutely oppositional terms—punks, say, whose aggressively shredded look served as a general fuck you—mods didn’t hide the fact that they shopped, and cared about what they bought. While they attacked middle-class office drudgery and lily-white respectability, they also rejected a rigid British class system that denied them access to a life of consumer luxuries and services—a life brimming with the very stuff work would enable them to purchase. Mods were, in short, a half-rebellious youth subculture that kept one eye trained on the rewards of adulthood. Mostly working-class kids, they railed against the system because, deep down, they wanted their share of its bounty.

Maria Lassnig Kantate - YouTube →

I´ve scrambled up the peaks and reached the summit
my whole long life just lies beneath my feet.
But I´m still searching for — the stone of wisdom
Life´s made me cautious, Life still calls the beat.

mocatv:

"Mike [Kelley] told me that he saw this early, I guess you could call it a band, that I had when I was going to school in Toronto. He called it noise garage, which was actually great, because I never had a name for what we did. Our teacher, George Manupelli, got us a gig at the ann Arbor Film Festival. They ended up pulling the plug on us. But Mike was there, and I didn’t meet him, but he said it kind of inspired him to go home and start a noise garage band. And I guess that became Destroy All Monsters."—Kim Gordon. 
[Photo: Kelley and Gordon, Los Angeles, 1985. Courtesy of John Hamois.]

mocatv:

"Mike [Kelley] told me that he saw this early, I guess you could call it a band, that I had when I was going to school in Toronto. He called it noise garage, which was actually great, because I never had a name for what we did. Our teacher, George Manupelli, got us a gig at the ann Arbor Film Festival. They ended up pulling the plug on us. But Mike was there, and I didn’t meet him, but he said it kind of inspired him to go home and start a noise garage band. And I guess that became Destroy All Monsters."—Kim Gordon

[Photo: Kelley and Gordon, Los Angeles, 1985. Courtesy of John Hamois.]

(via goosebumpsfitsandmalaria)