Try again. Fail again. Fail better.
Install Theme
Rather than a true self versus its estranged form, or a reproductive sphere of practice
separate from a sphere of properly capitalist production, an alternative critical strategy
might thus hinge instead on the distinction between life and work and a vision of what
subjects in relation could become in contrast to what they are. These would be, in short,
critical standpoints grounded not in separate spheres of practice but in the possibility of different qualities of life; not in a claim about who we are but rather in a vision of who we might want to become; not in an essence but in a logic of political desire immanent
to existence.
Apply for IMG 
MGMT We’re looking for artists who like to talk and write about images. Founded in 2008 in response to a series of studio visits in which artists showed not only their work but their digital image collections, IMG MGMT invites artists to produce image-based essays. We’re now accepting applications for our summer 2014 IMG MGMT series! 


What Is IMG MGMT? 
IMG MGMT is an image-essay series conceived and written by artists. The format is completely open; there are are no rules. Artists have based their essays on found images, constructed images, stock photography, and even discarded hard drive files. They’ve made videos. They’ve made quizzes. We’ve published essays with no text and edited thousands of words as well. The best way to get a sense of what IMG MGMT is, though, is to look at our past submissions. Whether examining the world of turbo-sculpture (VVORK), the variety of cubes in the art world (Deb Kass), or the squiggles used by women’s health groups (Shana Moulton), their inspired observations have reached millions of readers from all over the world.

via Calling All Artists! Summer 2014 IMG MGMT Applications Now Open

Apply for IMG
MGMT We’re looking for artists who like to talk and write about images. Founded in 2008 in response to a series of studio visits in which artists showed not only their work but their digital image collections, IMG MGMT invites artists to produce image-based essays. We’re now accepting applications for our summer 2014 IMG MGMT series!


What Is IMG MGMT?
IMG MGMT is an image-essay series conceived and written by artists. The format is completely open; there are are no rules. Artists have based their essays on found images, constructed images, stock photography, and even discarded hard drive files. They’ve made videos. They’ve made quizzes. We’ve published essays with no text and edited thousands of words as well. The best way to get a sense of what IMG MGMT is, though, is to look at our past submissions. Whether examining the world of turbo-sculpture (VVORK), the variety of cubes in the art world (Deb Kass), or the squiggles used by women’s health groups (Shana Moulton), their inspired observations have reached millions of readers from all over the world.

via Calling All Artists! Summer 2014 IMG MGMT Applications Now Open

Who needs a Blood Moon when you have a Star Tube? (via Gifs — Man Bartlett)

Who needs a Blood Moon when you have a Star Tube? (via Gifs — Man Bartlett)

Before the advent of MTV, Pat Ivers and Emily Armstrong spent their nights documenting the explosive and innovative movement that would become the punk rock music and art scene. The artists worked in New York City nightclubs like CBGB, Mudd Club, and Danceteria, and presented the performances on their cable TV show, Nightclubbing.

The definitive historic video record of the 1975–80 NYC punk scene, the recently remastered Go Nightclubbing Archive includes footage of 82 bands in 115 performances, including the Dead Boys, Iggy Pop, the Heartbreakers, John Cale, the Cramps, DNA, the Lounge Lizards, Bush Tetras, Sun Ra, the Go-Go’s, Teenage Jesus and the Jerks, James Chance and the Contortions, and many others. MAD’s screening series will be the first time the newly restored archive has ever been shown.
via Go Nightclubbing Archive | The Museum of Arts and Design (MAD)

Before the advent of MTV, Pat Ivers and Emily Armstrong spent their nights documenting the explosive and innovative movement that would become the punk rock music and art scene. The artists worked in New York City nightclubs like CBGB, Mudd Club, and Danceteria, and presented the performances on their cable TV show, Nightclubbing.

The definitive historic video record of the 1975–80 NYC punk scene, the recently remastered Go Nightclubbing Archive includes footage of 82 bands in 115 performances, including the Dead Boys, Iggy Pop, the Heartbreakers, John Cale, the Cramps, DNA, the Lounge Lizards, Bush Tetras, Sun Ra, the Go-Go’s, Teenage Jesus and the Jerks, James Chance and the Contortions, and many others. MAD’s screening series will be the first time the newly restored archive has ever been shown.

via Go Nightclubbing Archive | The Museum of Arts and Design (MAD)

Just home from the opening reception for The New Romantics at Eyebeam, curated by the wonderful Claudia Hart. A lot of great work, including the print Aunt Lizzie (2012) by Katie Torn. Not to be missed.  

Just home from the opening reception for The New Romantics at Eyebeam, curated by the wonderful Claudia Hart. A lot of great work, including the print Aunt Lizzie (2012) by Katie Torn. Not to be missed.  

artpractical:

Within a neoliberal economy that supports the debt-backed-professionalization of artists and activists, I question the relationship between overproduction and underpayment. What are the conditions that make overproduction desirable? When did monetary payment for art and activism become necessary? While artists and activists demand payment for work, we must also articulate our relationship to payment systems: market sales, state-support, philanthropy, and solidarity economies that center on livelihood. Acknowledging the diverse economies that I circulate in, I hope this writing points towards the internal contradictions that make professionalized, debtor artists and activists in the United States (including me) hustle for cash while engaging in projects on scales that cannot possibly compensate all participants equitably.
From Caroline Woolard’s “(Un)doing (Un)compensation” in Art Practical Issue 5.4 —> http://bit.ly/P3ie1T
Image: Caroline Woolard. Barricade to Bed, 2013; barricade, wood, DIY toolkit, open access manual; Courtesy of the Artist.

artpractical:

Within a neoliberal economy that supports the debt-backed-professionalization of artists and activists, I question the relationship between overproduction and underpayment. What are the conditions that make overproduction desirable? When did monetary payment for art and activism become necessary? While artists and activists demand payment for work, we must also articulate our relationship to payment systems: market sales, state-support, philanthropy, and solidarity economies that center on livelihood. Acknowledging the diverse economies that I circulate in, I hope this writing points towards the internal contradictions that make professionalized, debtor artists and activists in the United States (including me) hustle for cash while engaging in projects on scales that cannot possibly compensate all participants equitably.

From Caroline Woolard’s “(Un)doing (Un)compensation” in Art Practical Issue 5.4 —> http://bit.ly/P3ie1T

Image: Caroline Woolard. Barricade to Bed, 2013; barricade, wood, DIY toolkit, open access manual; Courtesy of the Artist.

seemstween:

Illuminati Girl Gang 4 is here!!! 
Illuminati Girl Gang is a zine that is dedicated to showcasing female perspectives in art and literature. 
Includes original poetry, art, and short stories by Ana Cecilia Alvarez, Genevieve Belleveau, Arvida Byström, Ana Carrete, Sarah Cook, Thea Alix De Gubernatis, Kate Durbin, Alicia Eler, Elizabeth Ellen, Mira Gonzalez, Rachel Hyman, Chelsea Hodson, Rosemary Kirton, Caroline Alice Lopez, Laura Marie Marciano, JoAnna Novak, LK Shaw
Edited by Gabby Bess
Cover Image by Amy Worrall 
Pre-order a copy here. *Cover image is subject to change. 

seemstween:

Illuminati Girl Gang 4 is here!!! 

Illuminati Girl Gang is a zine that is dedicated to showcasing female perspectives in art and literature. 

Includes original poetry, art, and short stories by Ana Cecilia Alvarez, Genevieve Belleveau, Arvida Byström, Ana Carrete, Sarah Cook, Thea Alix De Gubernatis, Kate Durbin, Alicia Eler, Elizabeth Ellen, Mira Gonzalez, Rachel Hyman, Chelsea Hodson, Rosemary Kirton, Caroline Alice Lopez, Laura Marie Marciano, JoAnna Novak, LK Shaw

Edited by Gabby Bess

Cover Image by Amy Worrall 

Pre-order a copy here. *Cover image is subject to change. 

We won’t answer your status updates. We will throw a switch and let bots do the data entries for us while we go for a stroll.[1] We will not cater to your expectations, we feel nothing but disdain for your conformism. We refuse to be stripped of our data. We will not submit to hours of tweaking of your privacy settings, to turning off Retweets, only to limit unwanted exposure and uncontrollable data leakage. Equally, opt-in defaults have become agents of forced labor. We lost interest and will no longer be caught in your web, enthralled and captured. When we refuse to perform ourselves, we will manage to break our attention away from your centralized hubs. We don’t trust you and don’t believe that somehow, suddenly you’ll act ethically and respect our relationships. We will seek new ways of coming together, not just temporarily but for the long haul. We don’t boycott; we defect, we don’t need your hall of mirrors. We don’t have to look cool; we quit your reputation economy. We are tired of soliciting “likes” from our friends, which are then used to advertise to them. We are weary of being tagged in random photos and don’t want to waste time thinking up authentic witticisms. We may not beat your mighty commerce and security apparatus but we can break away from your networked spectacle of self-promotion. (via When the Factory Turns Cold - Trebor Scholz ‘journalisms’ - Collectivate.net)

We won’t answer your status updates. We will throw a switch and let bots do the data entries for us while we go for a stroll.[1] We will not cater to your expectations, we feel nothing but disdain for your conformism. We refuse to be stripped of our data. We will not submit to hours of tweaking of your privacy settings, to turning off Retweets, only to limit unwanted exposure and uncontrollable data leakage. Equally, opt-in defaults have become agents of forced labor. We lost interest and will no longer be caught in your web, enthralled and captured. When we refuse to perform ourselves, we will manage to break our attention away from your centralized hubs. We don’t trust you and don’t believe that somehow, suddenly you’ll act ethically and respect our relationships. We will seek new ways of coming together, not just temporarily but for the long haul. We don’t boycott; we defect, we don’t need your hall of mirrors. We don’t have to look cool; we quit your reputation economy. We are tired of soliciting “likes” from our friends, which are then used to advertise to them. We are weary of being tagged in random photos and don’t want to waste time thinking up authentic witticisms. We may not beat your mighty commerce and security apparatus but we can break away from your networked spectacle of self-promotion. (via When the Factory Turns Cold - Trebor Scholz ‘journalisms’ - Collectivate.net)

By Everyone, For No One, Every Day opens with a reception at Postmasters Gallery on April 26 from 5:30-8pm (by Eva and Franco Mattes)

No doubt, some will find the idea of engineering online platforms to promote diversity unsettling and — a word with some irony embedded in it — paternalistic, but such criticism ignores the ways online spaces are already contrived with specific outcomes in mind. They are, as a start, designed to serve Silicon Valley venture capitalists, who want a return on investment, as well as advertisers, who want to sell us things. The term “platform,” which implies a smooth surface, misleads us, obscuring the ways technology companies shape our online lives, prioritizing certain purposes over others, certain creators over others, and certain audiences over others.

If equity is something we value, we have to build it into the system, developing structures that encourage fairness, serendipity, deliberation, and diversity through a process of trial and error. The question of how we encourage, or even enforce, diversity in so-called open networks is not easy to answer, and there is no obvious and uncomplicated solution to the problem of online harassment. As a philosophy, openness can easily rationalize its own failure, chalking people’s inability to participate up to choice, and keeping with the myth of the meritocracy, blaming any disparities in audience on a lack of talent or will.

Michael Hardt on The Politics of Love and Evil (by tvochannel)

e-flux-e-flux:

Agency of Unrealized Projects (AUP) holds an open call for unrealized artworks
www.e-flux.com/aup

e-flux-e-flux:

Agency of Unrealized Projects (AUP) holds an open call for unrealized artworks

www.e-flux.com/aup

In “The New Existentialism,” French and American thinkers and artists—including Emily Apter, Patricia Fulguières, Tristan Garcia, and Patrice Maniglier—will evoke some recent philosophical proposals and link them with related artistic practices. More specifically, emerging philosophical tendencies around the notion of objectivity, and of Speculative Realism, will be put in tension with similarly developing philosophical approaches that encourage subtle re-readings of structuralism, a new reception of Félix Guattari’s legacy in the field of anthropology, and a political appropriation of the notion of anthropocene. An aspiration here is to underscore certain misunderstandings that oppose these different models and, in turn, to articulate and understand their disputes more clearly. 

via The Kitchen: The New Existentialism

In “The New Existentialism,” French and American thinkers and artists—including Emily Apter, Patricia Fulguières, Tristan Garcia, and Patrice Maniglier—will evoke some recent philosophical proposals and link them with related artistic practices. More specifically, emerging philosophical tendencies around the notion of objectivity, and of Speculative Realism, will be put in tension with similarly developing philosophical approaches that encourage subtle re-readings of structuralism, a new reception of Félix Guattari’s legacy in the field of anthropology, and a political appropriation of the notion of anthropocene. An aspiration here is to underscore certain misunderstandings that oppose these different models and, in turn, to articulate and understand their disputes more clearly.

via The Kitchen: The New Existentialism

The New Romantics is an exhibition exploring the ways in which contemporary artists using digital media engage the body, representations of nature, poetic irony, and expressions of individuality as originally expressed in 19th Century Romanticism. By drawing equivalences between then and now, this exhibition identifies a critical precedent for artists today that are responding to their ever changing technological environment. Just as the Romantics responded to the industrial revolution, this group of artists are similarly responding to the current information revolution. 

via The New Romantics | eyebeam.org

The New Romantics is an exhibition exploring the ways in which contemporary artists using digital media engage the body, representations of nature, poetic irony, and expressions of individuality as originally expressed in 19th Century Romanticism. By drawing equivalences between then and now, this exhibition identifies a critical precedent for artists today that are responding to their ever changing technological environment. Just as the Romantics responded to the industrial revolution, this group of artists are similarly responding to the current information revolution.

via The New Romantics | eyebeam.org